Setting Up A business in China: Top 5 Mistakes Foreign Businesses Make

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Setting up a business in China can be a great opportunity for foreign companies looking to expand their operations and tap into one of the world’s largest and fastest-growing markets. However, there are many challenges that come with doing business in China, and making mistakes during the setup process can have serious consequences. That’s why it’s important to approach the process with caution and avoid common mistakes that can cause setbacks, delays, and even failure.

In this article, we’ll discuss the top mistakes that foreign companies make when setting up a business in China and provide tips on how to avoid them. By following these recommendations, you’ll be better equipped to navigate the complex and rapidly changing business landscape in China and set your company up for success. So let’s get started by taking a closer look at why it’s so important to avoid mistakes when setting up a business in China.

setting up a business in china

Mistake #1: Failure to understand the local market

When setting up a business in China, one of the most common mistakes foreign companies make is failing to understand the local market. China has a unique business environment that is different from what many companies are used to in their home countries. Therefore, it’s important to thoroughly research and understand the market conditions, consumer behavior, cultural norms, and business regulations in China before entering the market.

Failure to understand the local market can lead to a variety of consequences, including low sales, inability to compete with local companies, and even legal issues. For example, companies such as Uber and Airbnb faced significant challenges in China due to their failure to understand the local market and the competitive landscape. Uber’s pricing strategy, which was successful in other markets, failed to resonate with Chinese consumers, leading to a loss of market share to local ride-hailing services. Similarly, Airbnb’s business model struggled to compete with established local companies, such as Tujia and Xiaozhu.

To avoid this mistake, it’s important to conduct extensive market research and gather insights from local experts. This can include hiring a local consultant or partnering with a Chinese company to gain a better understanding of the market. It’s also important to adapt your business strategy and product offerings to meet the specific needs and preferences of Chinese consumers. By doing so, you’ll be better positioned to succeed when setting up a business in China.

Mistake #2: Lack of cultural awareness

Another common mistake foreign companies make when setting up a business in China is a lack of cultural awareness. China has a unique culture and way of doing business, and failing to understand and respect these cultural nuances can lead to misunderstandings, miscommunications, and ultimately, business failure.

For example, companies such as KFC and PepsiCo struggled to adapt to Chinese cultural norms, which impacted their brand image and sales. KFC’s initial marketing campaign in China featured the slogan “finger-lickin’ good,” which was not well-received by Chinese consumers, as it somehow translated to “eat your fingers off”. Similarly, PepsiCo’s slogan “Come Alive with the Pepsi Generation” was mistranslated in Chinese as “Pepsi brings your ancestors back from the dead,” which caused significant backlash and damage to the brand’s reputation.

To avoid this mistake, it’s important to invest in cultural awareness training for your employees and partners. This can include learning about Chinese business etiquette, communication styles, and social customs. It’s also important to work with local partners who have a deep understanding of the culture and can help bridge the gap between your company and the local market. By demonstrating cultural awareness and respect, you’ll be better positioned to build trust and establish strong relationships when setting up a business in China.

Mistake #3: Insufficient legal preparation

One of the most critical mistakes foreign companies make when setting up a business in China is insufficient legal preparation. China has a complex legal system, and foreign companies must comply with a range of regulations and laws to operate legally. Failure to comply with these regulations can result in significant legal and financial consequences, including fines, closure of operations, and even legal action against the company and its executives.

For example, Google faced significant legal challenges when it entered the Chinese market in 2006. The company failed to comply with China’s strict censorship regulations and was eventually forced to shut down its search engine in China in 2010. Similarly, Apple faced legal issues in China due to its failure to comply with local regulations related to intellectual property rights.

To avoid this mistake, it’s important to invest in sufficient legal preparation when setting up a business in China. This includes hiring local legal experts who can guide you through the legal process and ensure compliance with local regulations. It’s also important to conduct thorough due diligence on potential partners and suppliers to ensure they have the necessary licenses and certifications to operate legally. By prioritizing legal compliance and preparation, you’ll be better positioned to avoid legal issues when setting up a business in China.

setting up a company in china mistakes

Mistake #4: Not having the right partners

Having the right partners is crucial when setting up a business in China. Chinese business culture places a strong emphasis on relationships and networking, and having the right partners can help foreign companies navigate the local market, access resources, and establish trust with local customers and stakeholders. However, selecting the wrong partners can lead to significant challenges and setbacks.

For example, when Walmart entered the Chinese market in the 1990s, it struggled to establish its brand and gain market share. This was partly due to its reliance on a strategy of importing products from overseas, which made its prices less competitive than local retailers. Walmart also faced challenges due to its poor selection of local partners, who were not able to provide the necessary insights and connections to help Walmart succeed in the local market.

To avoid this mistake, it’s important to invest time and resources in selecting the right partners when setting up a business in China. This includes conducting thorough due diligence on potential partners, including their track record, reputation, and local connections. It’s also important to establish clear expectations and communication channels with partners, and to develop strong relationships based on mutual trust and respect. By selecting the right partners, you’ll be better positioned to succeed in the local market and avoid the challenges and setbacks that can result from poor partner selection.

Mistake #5: Underestimating the language barrier

The language barrier can be a significant challenge when setting up a business in China. Mandarin Chinese is the official language in China, and while many people in major cities speak English, the majority of the population does not. This can make it difficult for foreign companies to communicate effectively with local stakeholders, including suppliers, customers, and government officials. Underestimating the importance of the language barrier can lead to significant challenges and setbacks for foreign companies.

For example, when KFC entered the Chinese market in the 1980s, it faced significant challenges due to the language barrier. The company struggled to communicate effectively with its local employees, which led to misunderstandings and errors in its operations. KFC eventually invested in language training programs for its employees, which helped to improve communication and drive business growth in the local market.

To avoid this mistake, it’s important to invest in language training and translation services when setting up a business in China. This includes ensuring that key employees, including managers and customer service representatives, have the language skills necessary to communicate effectively with local stakeholders. It’s also important to prioritize clear communication and avoid assumptions or misunderstandings due to language barriers. By investing in language training and translation services, you’ll be better positioned to overcome the language barrier and succeed in setting up a business in China.

Company in China common mistakes

Conclusion

Setting up a business in China can be a challenging and complex process, and it’s important to avoid common mistakes that can derail your efforts. In this article, we’ve highlighted five of the most common mistakes that foreign companies make when setting up operations in China, including failure to understand the local market, lack of cultural awareness, insufficient legal preparation, poor partner selection, and underestimating the language barrier.

To avoid these mistakes, it’s important to conduct thorough market research, invest in cultural and language training, work with experienced legal professionals, carefully evaluate potential partners, and prioritize clear communication with local stakeholders. By taking these steps, you’ll be better positioned to succeed in setting up a business in China and tap into the enormous potential of this dynamic market.

If you’re considering setting up a business in China, we encourage you to reach out to us at NNRoad. We would love to help you set up your operations in China and give you the boost to begin your global expansion!

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